Former Washington County Ambulance District Administrator and Wife Indicted on Federal Fraud Charges

 

St. Louis, MO – The former Administrator for the Washington County Ambulance District, William Gum, a/k/a “Mal” and his wife, Charlena Gum, a/k/a “Charli”, who also was an employee of district, were indicted on charges involving stealing from the District, an agency that receives Federal program benefits.

 

According to the indictment, William “Mal” Gum was the Administrator for the Washington County Ambulance District, an agency that receives more than $10,000 of Medicare program benefits each year.  Mal Gum’s salary was set by the Board of the District.  The indictment alleges that between 2012 and 2016, Mal Gum paid himself a salary that was higher than the salary authorized by the Board and that he used District funds to pay for health insurance for his dependents without authorization. Mal Gum is charged with stealing at least $5,000 a year from the District between 2012 and 2016. 

 

Additionally, the indictment alleges that Charlena “Charli” Gum and Mal Gum used District credit cards to purchase personal items.  Between September 1, 2014 and November 29, 2014 Charli and Mal Gum used the District credit card to purchase more than 30 gift cards in denominations of $50 and $100, music CDs, undergarments, clothing, and other personal items and groceries.  According to the indictment, Mal Gum received itemized bills for the fraudulent purchases and paid the bills from the District bank account.

 

William Gum, 58, Potosi, MO, was indicted by a federal grand jury on five felony counts of federal program theft, one count of conspiracy to commit access device fraud, and one felony count of access device fraud.

 

Charlena Gum, 43, Potosi, MO, was indicted by a federal grand jury on one felony count of federal program theft, one count of conspiracy to commit access device fraud, and one felony count of access device fraud.

 

If convicted, each count of federal program theft carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and/or fines up to $250,000; conspiracy to commit access device fraud carries a maximum of five years in prison and/or fines up to $250,000; and access device fraud carries a maximum of ten years in prison and/or fines up to $250,000. In determining the actual sentences, a Judge is required to consider the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines, which provide recommended sentencing ranges.

 

This case was investigated by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.  Assistant United States Attorney Jeannette Graviss is handling the case for the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

 

As is always the case, charges set forth in an indictment are merely accusations and do not constitute proof of guilt.  Every defendant is presumed to be innocent unless and until proven guilty.                                                                                   

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