Law Enforcement Seeks to Locate Individual Wanted for First-Degree Murder

Members of the FBI’s Washington Field Office and Metropolitan Police Department Safe Streets Task Force are requesting the public’s assistance in locating Elliott Avery Starks, 34, who is being sought in connection with the homicide of Antina Pratt, 40, of Southeast, Washington, D.C. Pratt’s body was found brutally stabbed multiple times on Tuesday, November 8, 2016, at approximately 3:00 p.m. on the Suitland Parkway-Buena Vista Bike Trail near the 2600 Block of Pomeroy Road, S.E.

Elliott Avery Starks is described as a black male, 165 pounds, 5’11” tall, with brown eyes, a medium complexion, and black hair (balding on top). 

The FBI’s Washington Field Office and Metropolitan Police Department Safe Streets Task Force is seeking Elliott Avery Starks, who is sought in connection with the homicide of Antina Pratt.

The Metropolitan Police Department holds an arrest warrant for Starks, who was charged in the District of Columbia Superior Court on January 6, 2017, with premeditated first-degree murder while armed. Starks should be considered armed and dangerous. Starks may have fled the Washington, D.C. area and may possibly be in South Carolina, North Carolina, or Atlanta, Georgia.

The FBI/MPD Safe Streets Task Force requests that anyone with information about Starks to contact the FBI at (202) 278-2000 or the Metropolitan Police Department at (202) 727-9099. Anonymous information may be submitted to MPD’s text tip line by text messaging 50411 or online at tips.fbi.gov.

This case is being investigated by the FBI/MPD Safe Streets Task Force, which targets violent drug trafficking gangs and attempts to reduce violent crime in the District of Columbia. The Safe Streets Initiative is funded in part by the Baltimore Washington High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, as well as the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force. The initiative is one of more than 150 Safe Streets Task Forces across the country that combat street gangs by combining federal, state, and local police resources. The task forces, which began in 1992 in Los Angeles and the District of Columbia, address gang activity, including drug-related crimes.

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